Player Level

What's the best type of tennis racket equipment for a beginning, intermediate and advanced adult player?

The two primary measurements of tennis rackets are power and control. The perfect balance of power and control for one player will be totally wrong for another.
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What is NTRP?

The National Tennis Rating Program (NTRP) is the official system for determining the levels of competition for the USTA League Program.
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What string tension should I use?

Staying within the manufacturer's tension range, the general rule of thumb for string tension is as follows:

Higher tension = better control, less power, yields shorter shots
Lower tension = less control, more power, yields longer shots

Adjust string tension according to desired effect.
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What is the ideal head size?

Tennis rackets typically come in one of three head sizes: midsize, mid-plus and oversize. General industry guidelines say that a midsize racket will offer between 85 to 95 sq. inches of hitting area, a mid-plus racket will offer between 95 to 105 sq. inches of hitting area and an oversize racket will offer more than 105 sq. inches of hitting area.
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Do extra-long rackets give you better coverage of the tennis court?

The standard racket length measures 27 to 28 inches. This length is appropriate for not only beginning tennis players but also for intermediate and advanced players as well. More than 28 inches in length for beginning players could prove unwise, as these rackets are more difficult to control.
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What is strung or swing weight?

The weight reported here is for an unstrung racquet. As different strings weigh different amounts, we cannot say for certain what the strung weight of any given racquet will be until it is strung. Most sets of string weigh approx. 5 ounces but again, it varies string by string. The swing weight of the racket is how heavy the racket feels when you swing it. The more weight you have distributed to the head of the racket, the higher the swing weight will be. If you have more of the racket's weight close to the handle, the swing weight will be lower. Also, extra-long racquets have a higher swing weight since there is more weight further from your hand due to the longer frame.

What is Weight (Unstrung)?

Weight (Unstrung): Refers to the racquet weight prior to stringing. As a general rule of thumb, the bigger the head size the lighter the racquet. This seems counter-intuitive but nonetheless it's true. Larger head-size racquets are typically lighter than smaller head-size racquets. This is a reflection of the preferences shown by the typical users of mid, mid-plus and oversize frames. Advanced players prefer heavier frames with lower power ratings that favor control and shot placement. Beginner players prefer lighter frames with higher power ratings that favor power and the maneuverability that comes with a light racquet. Click for more info.

How does balance affect the racquet?


The midpoint along the racket as measured from butt to head is used as the starting point to measure balance. If the racket is evenly balanced, its weight will be evenly distributed on either side of the midpoint, so that if you hold the racket parallel to the floor between your thumb and forefinger at this point, the racket will hang evenly.
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Why are tennis rackets made of graphite and titanium composites instead of wood?

Weight, strength and speed are the names of the game in tennis racket design. Graphite, carbon fiber and titanium are the most common materials used in tennis rackets today (aluminum is still used in very low-end rackets as well). These high-tech materials cost less, are stronger and more versatile than is wood, lending greater creativity to racket designers and a much broader selection of products for players.
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What's beam width?

Think of it as the thickness of the racket. Look at the racket from the side - its width is the beam width. A thick beam width means stiffness and more power. A thinner beam width means flexibility and less power.
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What is power level?

How much punch the racket packs is the power level. A high power level racket will generate lots of pop on the ball but will place less emphasis on control, whereas a low power level racket will leave it up to you to do provide the power through a bigger, more aggressive swing while giving you more control.
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What is swing speed?

How fast you swing the racket is your swing speed. If you have a fast swing speed, you generate more power and so you don't need the racket to do this for you. A high-powered frame will send the ball flying and your shots will go long. If your swing speed is slower, you may need a racquet that generates more power. Of course, adjusting string tension will also impact how the ball comes off the racquet and can be used to fine-tune your "power setting."
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What does the string pattern have to do with how the racquet works?

This is the number of mains (strings going up and down, from handle to head) and crosses (strings going left to right) that create the string bed.
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What string tension should I use?

Staying within the manufacturer's tension range, the general rule of thumb for string tension is as follows:

Higher tension = better control, less power, yields shorter shots
Lower tension = less control, more power, yields longer shots

Adjust string tension according to desired effect.
Click for more info.

What is stiffness?

The racquet's resistance to bending or deforming upon impact with the ball. Stiff tennis racquets will be rated with a higher number and will offer more power. Flexible tennis racquets will be rated with a lower number and will offer more control. The stiffness of a racquet is determined by the materials used to make the frame and the cross section, or profile of the racquet.

What is swing weight?

Swing weight describes how heavy a racquet feels when it is swung. Swing weight increases as the racquet's weight is distributed more toward the head, so head-heavy and extra-long racquets have a high swing weight in relation to their stationary weight. The higher the number, the less maneuverable the tennis racquet will be. The lower the number, the more maneuverable the tennis racquet will be. A more aggressive, advanced player with a longer, faster swing, will likely prefer a racquet with a heavier swingweight. A less advanced player with a shorter, slower, more compact swing will likely prefer a tennis racquet with a lighter swingweight.



What's a set and what's a reel?

A set is an individual package of string. It is generally 42 feet long and can string one complete racquet. A reel is roughly 10 - 18 sets of string in one continuous roll. It is generally 330 to 720 feet long and can string up to 22 racquets, depending on total length. Reels are great for players looking to string their own racquet(s) but donÓ´ want to purchase individual sets. Reels are also a great value. Click for more info.

How do I choose string gauge?

Generally, the thicker the string the more durable the string is. String gauge works this way:

Lower Gauge = Thicker String
Higher Gauge = Thinner String

That means 16g string is thicker than 17g string.

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How is power rated?

Do It Tennis uses a unique rating system that helps our customers find the very best string for their game. Our power rating system works on a scale from 1 to 10. A one (1) string has no power at all. A ten (10) has maximum power. Click for more info.

What is the durability range?

Do It Tennis uses a unique rating system that helps our customers find the very best string for their game. Our durability rating system works on a scale from 1 to 10. A one (1) string has very little durability. A ten (10) has maximum durability. Click for more info.